HAVING THE COURAGE TO VOLUNTEER

Today is Memorial Day so I’ll start by simply thanking those who gave their lives while serving in our Armed Forces so that the rest of us continue to enjoy our freedoms and privilege that it is to live in the United States of America.  Today, this blog is dedicated to you.

Think of how many of these brave souls volunteered to enter the military and didn’t put their lives on the line because they were forced to by way of a draft, but rather because they wanted to volunteer to do good.  They wanted to give something back to their home land, or they wanted to simply feel that sense of honor and pride in serving their country or community.  They knew what the ultimate price could be, and they dove in head first anyway.

When you think about it this way, it’s kind of sad that even in communities that have hundreds of units or homes, it is often times next to impossible to find a few volunteers who are willing to serve on a Board of Directors each year and give something back to their community.  There’s no risk of loss of life or limb.  At worst, you’ll be called a few names and second guessed all the time.  At best, you will do good for your community and get the appreciation of some other owners and board members and some personal satisfaction in knowing you have helped your community.  If you find out that the work simply isn’t for you, you can always quit.

Knowing that the risks are few and that some of your neighbors serve on the Board for years or decades on end, is there anyone out there who believes that there may be a moral obligation to help out if you can by volunteering to serve your community?  Maybe that responsibility shouldn’t be left to the same people year after year.

Or……. When the lack of volunteers reaches a critical low, should we institute a form of a “draft” and force people to serve on a Board, like some people want to see?  Would that work?  I know this…… even if they were drafted and didn’t sign up for the armed forces voluntarily, I never met one former member of the armed forces who regrets having served.

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